My Facebook Time-Out

Over the past years my social web interaction shifted from Twitter and this very blog more and more to Facebook. I have so many contacts and interactions there that it feels very overwhelming and occupying a good chunk of my free time that I would love to spend otherwise: Hiking through the sun, having random thoughts and ideas, read long-form articles or play video games. I was under the impression that engaging on Facebook – and to a lesser extend on Twitter – would allow me to relax, to have social interactions and would be worth the time. I have realized that this became less and less the case. Either things are fairly irrelevant for me, or there is in-depth political discussion. This made Facebook feel like a burden for me now, and the only way to reevaluate my usage is to stop using it almost completely. While I had a pinned tab with Facebook open at all time, as well as the mobile app installed, I have now closed that tab and removed the app from my iPhone. I have disabled all notifications. This is day three and I only had brief looks into Facebook on the mobile web version to check for important notifications. I also allow myself to syndicate content to Facebook – like this blog post and via an iOS extension called Linky (which doesn’t currently support sharing to WordPress, e.g. this blog hint hint) but also using custom Workflows. Although my brain doesn’t yet know what to do with those free cycles, it feels like a change for the better. I want to continue at least for another week or two. Then I probably need to make significant changes to the websites and people I follow to reduce the load. The experiments of CGP Grey and Myke Hurley inspired me for this time-out. They outline their methods of “Dialing Down” in an Episode of their (much recommended) Cortex podcast. (Image by Jonathan Bean via Unsplash.)