I’m in San Diego where I’ll attend the W3C WAI Education and Outreach WG Face-to-Face meeting, and CSUN, the biggest accessibility conference. It’s always amazing to be able to work with my colleagues in one room and to meet all accessibility experts in one place.

  • Beta: W3C/WAI Website – We managed to launch the beta for the new WAI site last week. There are still a few rough edges, but it is essential to get it in front of people. A lot of work from many people went into the site, from design, user testing, development. I made sure we can edit resources in their respective Jekyll projects on GitHub and then integrate it into one repository using git submodules. All repositories use one common theme, so changes to it will be reflected in all resource previews, hosted on GitHub pages.

  • Color: Colorblind Accessibility on the Web – Fail and Success Cases – An excellent overview of colorblindness and common pitfalls.

  • Principles: Accessibility Interview Questions – Everyone should have answers to the question collected by Scott O’Hara. Most aim at general principles than specific techniques.

  • Notifications: Inclusive Components: Notifications – Another excellent write-up by Heydon Pickering.

  • Buttons: Designing Button States – Tyler Sticka on different aspects of button design. Sweating details like this can greatly improve the usability and accessibility of your website or application.

  • PWA: Minimal viable service worker – I don’t know enough about Progressive Web Apps to implement them correctly, yet. However, Jeremy Keith’s article feels like a good starting point to learn more about it.

  • Fonts: Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com – Interesting article on a very particular approach to shipping fonts.

This was a long work week, so here are some games and apps instead of articles as I couldn’t find time to concentrate on pieces.

  • TV: Jessica Jones, Season 2 – While work was plenty, some of it was also repetitive, so I managed to watch the new Season of Jessica Jones. Very intense storytelling.

  • iOS: Altos Odyssey – When I downloaded Alto for the first time, I dismissed it as being too similar to its precursor. However, it has more facets, and it’s easier to achieve goals.

  • Podcast: Playing for Fun with Tiffany Arment and Myke Hurley – Two people talk about the positive of a video game. It’s refreshing and fun. Episode 2 is about “Celeste” which I have never played, but Episode one was about one of my favorite games…

  • Switch: Super Mario Odyssey – Such a refreshing re-imagination of Mario games. Certainly one of the best titles on the Switch to date.

  • Version Control: Tower – Tower is a fantastic app for git version control. The people behind the app also have published a comprehensive learning resource for git.

  • CSS: Third party CSS is not safe by Jake Archibald – Whenever you embed any resource from a third-party server, you are building a tunnel under your site’s security. The same also applies to CSS. Great list of examples from Jake.

  • Browser: Firefox Developer Edition & its inspector – Working with grids and other newer CSS benefits from a good inspector and Firefox has stepped up the game. Especially inspecting grids is impressive. The browser also has a beautiful and distinct dark theme.

In Sunday Seven I publish a list of seven links to things on the internet. The only criteria to make it in this category is that it is interesting to me.

  • Accessibility: Apple Park’s Visitor Center by twitter user @xarph – An interesting twitter thread about the many small details build for accessibility.1 (If you enjoy twitter threads as much as I do2, read the whole thread as one article on “Thread reader”.)

  • AMP: “Ends and Means” by Jeremy Keith – Insightful post by Jeremy on how companies can act together to help good and how sometimes they go a step too far. To use new CSS properties in Firefox, websites need to support HTTPS before those are available to them. This behavior creates a whole layer of CSS that is harder to be used while learning.

  • Accessibility: “WAI-ARIA Screen Reader Compatibility” – An overview of ARIA support which is good, but there are always edge-cases. It also shows the tests used to determine support, so if you want to get an impression on how different ARIA roles or attributes are voiced, you can look it up here.3

  • Layout: “Layout Land” by Jen Simmons – Lots and lots of short videos that describe how to create different layouts with the new capabilities in CSS & Browsers.

  • TV: “The Tick” (Amazon Originals) – Sometimes, especially while coding, I need to distract parts of my brain while working. The Tick is funny and not hard to follow. I enjoyed it.

  • Podcast: Game Show by The Incomparable – I’m late picking up this particular podcast because I dismissed the idea that game shows as podcasts could work. Boy, was I wrong! I love “Random Pursuit,” “Inconceivable,” “Low Definition,” and the text adventures and they had me spontaneously laughing out loud several times in the last few weeks.

  • Action: #WHOagainstGuns – Over 40 Doctor Who podcasters are supporting actions for gun control in the U.S. and plan to produce an exclusive series of commentary podcasts for the classic story “The War Games.” Access to those unique recordings will be only available to donors. More info, including a list of possible organizations to donate to, is available on the Reality Bomb website.


  1. I don’t necessarily agree with the marking of the AED which should arguably be easier to find, but all in all, it is a testament that accessibility does not need to look ugly. 

  2. Which means “not very much.” 
  3. Beware: As those test cases are there for testing ARIA attributes the code might not be an example of a best practice but of a possibility. 

Kettwig, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
8°C